Skip to Main Content

Neurodiversity Resources

A guide dedicated to actively researching neurodiversity and seeking neurodiverse literature and media.

General Information

Disclosure Statement

The implementation of the research being utilized in this LibGuide is intended to promote the discovery of new materials that focus on neurodiversity, and accessibility topics. This is a general purpose guide that aims to amplify neurodiverse voices, explore new practices, and seek literature created by and/or featuring neurodiverse people and characters. 

Glossary of Terms

Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity is an umbrella term used to describe differences in the human brain in relation to a range of mental functions, such as sociability, learning and mood attention. The concept is a respectful way of thinking about our colleagues and communities. Neurodiversity aims to highlight the positive attributes of different neurocognitive functioning, rather than focus on deficits or deviations from a set standard.

 

Neurodivergence

A person whose brain ‘diverges’ from the majority can be described as neurodivergent (see also: ‘Neurotypical’). Neurodivergence can be genetic, the result of a brain-altering experience, or a combination of the two.
Neurodivergent conditions often come with pronounced strengths. However, there will typically also be areas where neurodivergent individuals struggle.

 

Terms and definitions derived from College of Policing Glossary of Terms.

Types of Neurodivergence or Neurodiversity

Neurological conditions encompassed by the terms ‘neurodivergence’ and ‘neurodiversity’ fall into three categories: applied, clinical and acquired. Over a period of an individual’s life, someone may experience an overlap of multiple types, which is why adult diagnoses are becoming more prevalent in society.

 

1. Applied neurodivergence or neurodiversity

This includes conditions with which an individual is born, and which are not considered to be a health condition. It refers to difficulties in the application of cognitive skills such as gross motor control, number concepts and reading. Conditions that can be classified as applied neurodivergence or neurodiversity include:

  • developmental coordination disorder or dyspraxia
  • dyscalculia
  • dysgraphia
  • dyslexia
2. Clinical neurodivergence or neurodiversity

This includes neurological differences with which an individual is born, and which are considered to be a health condition. Clinical neurodiversity relates to difficulties in communication, social skills, behaviour and impulse control. Conditions that can be classified as clinical neurodiversity include:

  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • autism spectrum condition
  • intellectual disability
  • Tourette syndrome
3. Acquired neurodivergence or neurodiversity

This includes neurological differences that change cognition and behaviour in the individual, and which can develop as part of a health condition or injury. Acquired neurodivergence or neurodiversity relates to conditions that can be resolved as an illness or injury heals, as well as conditions that can worsen as an individual’s health deteriorates. Conditions that can be classified as acquired neurodivergence or neurodiversity include:

  • acquired or traumatic brain injury
  • illnesses that cause changes in cognition and behaviour as a direct result of the illness or through treatment of the illness
  • mental ill health conditions such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression.

 

Terms and definitions derived from College of Policing Glossary of Terms.

Toolkits

Reference Guides