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Triton College Library Website: Events

Ongoing Programming

Chess Club

Chess ClubTriton College Chess Club meets in the Library every Thursday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. for a game or two of chess, or even a tournament. 

You don't have to be a member to participate. We especially encourage those who do not know how to play and would like to learn how to play chess.  All are welcome!

 

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If offline, call 708-456-0300 ext. 3698 or email refdesk@triton.edu

Workshops & Events

Welcome, and welcome back!

We have an exciting selection of programs and workshops planned for the Fall 2017 semester.  All events take place in the Library unless otherwise specified.

OCTOBER EVENTS

Weight, Weight… Do Tell me!: QCD and the Origin of Mass

Mass, and its origin, are mysterious. We know that the mass of everyday objects comes from the nucleons (protons and neutrons) in the nuclei of atoms. Simply count the number of these nucleons and you have a good idea of an object's mass. According to quantum chromodynamics (QCD), each proton or neutron consists of three quarks and some gluons. However, the combined mass of the quarks and gluons is only 1% of a nucleon's--what gives? Interactions between these tiny particles are the problem: they look simple in one way, but as interactions accumulate, supercomputers are needed to keep track of them. Over the past decade, looking at interactions as a way of understanding QCD has blossomed into a successful enterprise, solving old problems in physics and aiding new experiments. Beyond the mass of the proton (and you), these tools can broadly probe the mysteries of QCD to address problems in particle, nuclear and astrophysics.

Andreas Kronfeld is a scientist in the Theoretical Physics Department of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and a Hans Fischer Senior Fellow in the Institute for Advanced Study at the Technical University of Munich. He has been developing new ideas and methods for understanding QCD since his days as a Ph.D. student at Cornell University. Prominent among his achievements are some of the first predictions of QCD interaction rates and the mass of an exotic particle with both "beauty" and "charm," results which were subsequently confirmed by laboratory measurements. For these efforts he has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society and also of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Monday, October 9, 11 a.m.

Master Midterms

Free coffee in the Library on Monday, October 9

Co-hosted by the Library and the Writing Zone, a series of short workshops will be held in the Library's classroom and cover topics such as plagiarism, citations, and research. 

Tuesday, October 10

  • 10:30 a.m.: Citations Workshop
  • 11:30 a.m.: Plagiarism Workshop
  • 2:30 p.m.: Introduction to Database Searching Workshop

Thursday, October 12

  • 10:30 a.m.: Introduction to Database Searching Workshop
  • 11:30 a.m.: Citations Workshop
  • 2:30 p.m.: Plagiarism Workshop

Monday, October 9 through Thursday, October 12. All workshops take place in the Library Classroom, A-215.

1st Chess Tournament 2017

The tournament is free and open to all, members and non-members. Community members are welcome. Celebrate with us on National Chess Day, October 14.

Presented by the Triton College Chess Club and Triton College Library.

For registration, email Dr. Dubravka Juraga.

Saturday, October 14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Ahoy Matey!: Navigating the Rough Waters of Piracy and Copyright in the Digital Age

Copyright has been the hob-goblin of teachers since the invention of the mimeograph. Though grasping copyright and fair use can feel like a treasure hunt without a map, there are general principles that, if followed, can keep you on the straight and narrow. Our very own Triton College librarians and expert “sea-fair-users” will discuss the Constitutional basis for copyright, its implementation in the U.S. Code, and its impact on teaching in the twenty-first century.

Presented by Library Chairperson and Faculty Librarian Dr. Robert Connor and Director of Library Systems & Technical Services Hilary Meyer.

Faculty members may register online.

Wednesday, October 18, 1 p.m.-2 p.m., Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) Room E210-E 

Seed Hunting

Taught by Shilin Hora.

Saturday, October 21, time TBD

Work-in-Progress: Daniele Manni

Join us for a conversation with Daniele Manni, philosophy faculty at Triton. We will be chatting about his doctoral dissertation which he is defending in January next year:

What is liberty? Often philosophers characterize liberty as a  set of social and political conditions that free individuals from impediments or extend their scope of action. Other times liberty is defined as an essential trait of human life, assured by inalienable rights or existential condition. Neither of these definitions were satisfactory for the ancient Greek philosopher Plato, who conceived of liberty in terms of an individual’s character inclined to resist demagogical forces, prone to participate in earnest dialogue and able to self-determine one’s moral standing. In this talk we’ll explore how and why one should consider liberty in a Platonic sense.

Work-in-Progress seminars feature Triton College faculty discussing their current research or work.

Wednesday, October 25, 11 a.m.

The Augmented Human

Science and technology are helping the human race reach out and extend its capabilities and potential beyond our wildest dreams. Artificial organs, limbs, DNA mapping, genetic engineering, to name just a few, are redefining what it even means to be a human.

Join us for a conversation about scientific, philosophical, ethical, and psychological issues that are emerging with these scientific developments and which are critical to be addressed.

Participating in the discussion are Dr. Gabriel Guzman, a scientist and technologist, Dr. Elizabeth Freeland, a physicist, Daniele Manni, a philosopher, and Neal Parker, a historian.

Date and time TBD

NOVEMBER EVENTS

The Death Café

Death! What a powerful word. What a scary word. Poignant. Sad. What is death? Why do we die? Do we really die? How to grieve

Let’s gather to talk and share our thoughts and experiences about this important event in everyone’s life.

Hosted by Dr. Dubravka Juraga.

Wednesday, November 1

Robotics Workshop

Robots will take over Triton College when the college’s Engineering Technology Department invite youth to engage in hands-on activities in relation to one of the college’s newest program offerings, Mechatronics, also known as robotics.

The free workshop will introduce youth to the world of robotics by allowing them to build their own Lego™ robot that will be able to move in ways kids never imagined it could! Expert builders will be on hand to help.

The Library will supply all the materials; just bring your creativity!

No registration is required, but space is limited and will be based on first come, first served.

Saturday, November 4, 12 p.m.-3 p.m.

Water, Water Everywhere

Featuring Sheldon Turner, geology faculty.

Wednesday, November 8, 12 p.m.

Work-in-Progress: Paul Martinez

Featuring Paul Martinez, English faculty and author of My Kill Adore Him.

Work-in-Progress seminars feature Triton College faculty discussing their current research or work.

Thursday, November 9, 12:30 p.m.

Ahoy Matey!: Navigating the Rough Waters of Piracy and Copyright in the Digital Age

Copyright has been the hob-goblin of teachers since the invention of the mimeograph. Though grasping copyright and fair use can feel like a treasure hunt without a map, there are general principles that, if followed, can keep you on the straight and narrow. Our very own Triton College librarians and expert “sea-fair-users” will discuss the Constitutional basis for copyright, its implementation in the U.S. Code, and its impact on teaching in the twenty-first century.

Presented by Faculty Librarian Lauren Kosrow and Director of Library Systems & Technical Services Hilary Meyer.

Faculty members may register online.

Tuesday, November 14, 4 p.m.-5 p.m., Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) Room E210-E 

DECEMBER EVENTS

Hour of Code

The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in 180+ countries. 

Featuring Dr. Dubravka Juraga.

Saturday, December 2

Focus on Finals

Free coffee in the Library on Monday, December 4 at 9 a.m.!

Unwind at the Library: We will have Legos and coloring pages available at the Library to help you relax during these busy days!

Workshop Schedule:

Monday, December 4

  • 10 am: Plagiarism Workshop
  • 10:30 am: Introduction to Database Searching Workshop
  • 12 pm: One-on-One Research and Writing Help*
  • 2:30 pm: Citations Workshop

Tuesday, December 5

  • 10:30 am: Citations Workshop
  • 11:30 am: Introduction to Database Searching Workshop
  • 12:30 pm: Formatting Workshop
  • 4 pm: One-on-One Research and Writing Help*

Wednesday, December 6

  • 10 am: Citations Workshop
  • 10:30 am: Formatting Workshop
  • 2:30 pm: Introduction to Database Searching Workshop
  • 4 pm: One-on-One Research and Writing Help*

Thursday, December 7

  • 10:30 am: Introduction to Database Searching Workshop
  • 11:30 am: Plagiarism Workshop
  • 12 pm: One-on-One Research and Writing Help*
  • 1:30 pm: Citations Workshop

Sponsored by Triton College Library and Writing Zone.

Monday, December 4 through Thursday, December 7. *All workshops will be held in the Library Classroom, A-215, except for One-on-One Research and Writing Help, which will be held in the Writing Zone.

Seed Quilting Workshop

Taught by Shilin Hora.

Saturday, December 9

Live Art: Anime & Manga

Featuring Alyse Dolas.

Date and time TBD